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FAQ

 

Summer

  • What kind of soil is suitable for planting summer flowering bulbs,corms or tubers?

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    All types of soil are suitable for planting summer-flowering bulbs and tubers. Only extremely wet soil could present problems. The soil should be well loosened before planting. Heavy ‘’rich’’ clay soil can best be improved by mixing peat or compost into the top layer.
  • Do I need to fertilise summer flowering bulbs?

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    In principle, summer bulbs do not need extra fertilisation because the bulbous and tuberous plants contain their own storage food. Keeping bulbs for the following season. If summer bulbs are kept to be used again for a second year, it is advisable to apply a slow-acting fertiliser (9-9-6), especially in the case of nutritionally poor, sandy soil.
  • What is the best time to plant summer flowering bulbs?

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    Summer-flowering bulbs and tubers are planted in spring when there is no longer a chance of ground frost. Early planting is recommended. Gladioli and lilies can already be planted in March because they are not very sensitive to frost. Dahlia and tuberous begonias are best planted in late April or early May as these plants are sensitive to frost. For early flowering, you can of course start them indoors.
  • What are the best places in my garden to plant summer flowering bulbs?

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    Always plant summer bulbs in sunny spots. They can tolerate a little shadow, but the more sunlight they get, the lovelier they will bloom. Summer bulbs are an ideal addition to garden borders, planted between perennials and annuals. Magnificent summer gardens can be created by using different colour combinations and heights. Gladioli, Dahlias and Montbretias are excellently suited as cut flowers. They are perfect for planting in a special (cut flower) corner.
  • How deep should I plant summer flowering bulbs?

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    The rule of thumb, i.e. planting bulbs and tubers twice as deep as their height does not always apply to summer bulbs: Dahlias must be planted in such a way that a piece of the old stem barely protrudes from the soil. For good growth and development, planting distance should be 50 to 75 cm. Tuberous begonias have to be covered with a 1 to 2 cm layer of soil. Gladioli are usually planted 7 cm deep and 10 to 15 cm apart from each other. Lilies have tuberous roots and therefore have to be planted at least 20 cm deep. Cannas are planted directly beneath the top layer of soil. Galtonia, Eucomis and Ornithogalum have to be planted twice as deep as the height of the bulbs.
  • What is the best way to plant bulbs?

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    Before you start planting the bulbs, it’s best to set them down at the proper distance from each other. After digging a hole with a trowel or special bulb planter, the summer bulbs are planted at the correct depth, of course with the growth-point upward. Fill up with soil and press down lightly. If large quantities of bulbs are to be planted, it is more practical to first dig up the entire planting area. Then carefully press the bulbs or tubers into the soil at the right distance from each other and cover again with the earth removed earlier.
  • Do I have to water the flower bulbs I just planted?

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    It is advisable to water the bulbs after planting, unless nature takes care of the watering. The bulbs will form roots more quickly in moist soil, which is very important for the further development of the plant.
  • How can I create beautiful planting combinations?

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    The best results are achieved if heights, colour combinations and flowering periods are taken into consideration. It is preferable to plant summer bulbs in groups, but not in circles or squares, in order to obtain as natural an effect as possible. Gladioli and dahlia’s show up well in the company of annuals. Lilies, Eucomis and Montbretias can be excellently combined with perennials. Acidanthera is lovely in a border of perennials, for instance together with the blue Salvia nemorosa.
  • Can I leave summer flowering bulbs undisturbed so that they can naturalise?

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    Summer bulbs are basically not suited for naturalising because of their sensitivity to frost. If they are to be used for several years they’ll have to be dug up in autumn. Subsequently they need to be dried. This is best done under a shelter or in a shed. Once the bulbs have been air-dried they can be stored in cool and dry place. However, some botanical lilies are indeed suited for naturalising, such as the Lilium bulbiferum. The Colchicum and autumn-flowering crocuses can also be used for a naturalised garden. They can also be planted among creepers and ground covers.
  • Which summer flowering bulbs are most suitable for having inside my home?

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    Tuberous begonias are particularly well suited for indoor forcing. They require a lot of sunlight, but high temperatures should be avoided. Low-growing Dahlias can also be placed indoors in pots.
  • How should I provide tall gladioli and dahlias with support?

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    Dahlia’s and gladioli sometimes require a little extra support to keep them in an upright position. Ideal is an adjustable support ring that can be moved higher during the growing process. Naturally, a sturdy stick and florist’s wire also serves well as a support for tall summer flowers.
  • Can flower bulbs be planted in pots and containers?

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    Some summer bulbs thrive in flower boxes, especially tuberous begonias and low-growing Dahlias.
  • How can I enjoy my summer flowering bulbs for as long as possible?

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    The flowering period can be extended by picking off the dead flowers from Dahlias and tuberous begonias at an early stage.
  • What should Ii do with summer flowering bulbs after they bloom?

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    Summer bulbs are not winter hardy. This means they have to be removed from the soil, preferably after the first frost has started to kill the foliage. Lilies can withstand frost, as can other autumn-flowering bulbs like the Colchicums and the autumn crocus. Montbretias can only stay in the ground during the winter months if they’re covered with mulch (straw).
  • Are there also flower bulbs that bloom during the autumn?

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    In addition to summer bulbs there are also autumn-flowering bulbs such as the lilac-pink Colchicum, a large flower resembling the crocus which blooms between August and October. The autumn crocus, as the name suggests, also blossoms in autumn and comes in the colours light blue, lilac or violet. Both varieties are offered for sale in the months of July and August.